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#NationalLivingWage

NationalLivingWageThe Government’s new National Living Wage is being introduced on 1st April 2016. From this date it will be the law for employers to pay eligible employees at least the new rate of £7.20 per hour.

 

The National Living Wage will provide a direct boost to over one million workers in the UK this year – rewarding and providing security for working people. It is a key part of the Government’s plan to continue to move to a higher wage and building a more productive country, giving families the security of well-paid work.

 

If you’re working and aged 25 or over and not in the first year of an apprenticeship, you’ll be legally entitled to at least £7.20 per hour. That’s an extra fifty pence per hour in your pocket and The Government is committed to increasing this every year.

 

If you are under 25; the amount will depend on your age, but you must still be paid the National Minimum Wage. The Low Pay Commission has recommended that the National Minimum Wage is the highest possible level it can be without starting to cost young people their jobs. This is because unemployment is higher among those aged 16-24 compared with those who are 25 and over. As soon as you turn 25, you will be entitled to the National Living Wage of £7.20 per hour.

 

You can find out more by visiting https://www.livingwage.gov.uk/. Join the conversation on Twitter by following @bisgovuk and the hashtag #NationalLivingWage.

 





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